Incorporating Keywords In Your Resume

Regardless of how you plan to distribute your resume, keywords or buzzwords are a critical element in marketing yourself to the prospective employer. A resume rich in keywords is critical whether you are:

  • Selectively sending your resume to the hiring decision maker or an executive search consultant
  • Responding to a position posted online
  • Posting your resume on an executive search firm’s site, a membership organization’s site, or a function- or industry-specific site

In nearly all of the electronic options, your resume will be entered into a database where the recipient(s) can conduct a search of the most qualified candidate.

And how do you think these folks initially determine who’s the most qualified? Keywords. Their own set of keywords, based on the requirements of the position.

Due to the plethora of job seekers in the market, employers are only considering candidates who are a “perfect fit”. And today, recruiters are expanding their list of requirements to include very specific requirements.

For example, some job postings include the geographic location in which you must reside. Some require specific company experience, for example, you must have worked at Coca Cola for five years to be considered for the position. Some even state, “The unemployed need not apply.”

So, your first challenge is to figure out which keywords to include. In selecting keywords, it’s important to be crystal clear about your functional target. It also helps to be clear about your industry target. Positioning yourself as an expert in a function and an industry greatly enhances your chances of being selected.

Generally, keywords are nouns or noun phrases. The most common type of keyword that employers search for is a position title. Other keywords include degrees, prestigious college names, credentials, licenses and technical certifications, as well as hard skills (areas of expertise), techniques or tools (B2B business development, environmental engineering, Six Sigma, lean manufacturing), soft skills (team building, cross-cultural leadership), languages, affiliations, industry jargon and geographic locations (cities, states and even telephone area codes). If you are searching for a position in the Silicon Valley and your residence is in “Alum Rock” rather than “San Jose,” in parentheses add, “Silicon Valley area,” or “10 miles outside the Silicon Valley area.” Remember, a recruiter selecting candidates for a Silicon Valley company may be based in New York and may not be familiar with the outlying cities.

Next, research job postings and select four to five positions that sound like your dream position—postings for which you feel 110% qualified. You may also want to visit industry-specific association websites to identify keywords. Association sites generally educate members on the current trends and challenges facing the industry.

Read through each position or website and record all of the keywords. Look for keyword similarities and patterns across all positions and websites. Create a list that you can refer to and update on an ongoing basis. Then, rank order the keywords by the number of times they are mentioned in the various postings and sites.

To determine the keyword strength of your resume, run a search on your resume for each of the keywords on your new list. Highlight the ones you find. Now, you can determine which keywords you will need to add. While it is okay to include a keyword list in your executive summary, you will also want to weave the keywords throughout your resume because some systems are able to decipher lists from content and rank keywords found within the content higher on the search results.

When embedding keywords in the experience section, create a quantifiable value proposition story encompassing the keyword or phrase. For example:

“Developed and successfully executed strategy for divestiture of 3 facilities within 16 months to yield $8MM in cost reduction and $280MM in asset sales.”

“Restructured manufacturing-driven inventory management system into a global organization based on solid forecasting methodologies. Reduced back orders 50% while improving customer service levels; improved inventory turns 10%.”

In the examples above the keywords are in bold.

Caution, do not use so many keywords that the resume does not read well when viewed by the human eye. The number of keywords you use will depend on your function, industry, qualifications and years of experience. For example, if you have been in operations or technology for 20+ years, you will most likely have numerous keywords that you could include in your resume. However, only include keywords that relate to what you would like to do next.

If you intend to pursue different functions and industries, you will need to create multiple versions of your resume that include keywords appropriate for each function and industry. While this is a lot of work, it is critical in today’s job market. Just be sure to track which resume you sent for each position or which resume you posted on each site. Some functions and industries combine well on one resume and others do not. For more about this topic, read: How Many Versions of Your Resume Do You Need?

You should also include keywords in all of the documents in your executive job search portfolio (cover letters, bios, online profiles, positioning statements, leadership profiles, success stories, branding statements, introductions, reference dossiers, thank you letters, etc.).

While a targeted search is the most effective job search strategy, there may be times when you must use some of the online venues to pursue a position, at which point your keywords can make or break the opportunity.

The strategies outlined in this article can also be applied to your LinkedIn profile.

Feel free to send an email to beverly@harveycareers.com of you have any questions, comments, or concerns.

Share and Enjoy:

Beverly Harvey, an executive career coach and job search strategist for senior-level and C-level executives, is passionate about identifying her clients’ unique talents, crystallizing their brand, articulating their value proposition, and creating dynamic marketing materials and job search strategies to achieve a successful landing.

Beverly is the author of the book “Landing An Executive Position” and has contributed to 23 career books.

In business since 1991 … and on the web since 1998, Beverly has worked with executives from global Fortune 500 corporations, small- and medium-size enterprises, privately held companies, family owned businesses, government agencies, and non-profit organizations.

Certifications include:

* Credentialed Career Manager
* Certified Career Management Coach
* Certified Job & Career Transition Coach
* Reach Certified Personal Branding Strategist
* Reach Certified Social Branding Analyst
* Certified 360Reach Analyst
* Certified Executive & Leadership Development Coach
* Certified Job Search Strategist
* Certified Social Media Career Strategist
* Certified On-line Identity Manager
* Master Resume Writer
* Certified Professional Resume Writer

Beverly completed Coach training through The Academies and the Career Planning and Adult Development Network. She studied personal branding under the international personal branding guru, William Arruda.

Beverly is the Director of Job Search Academy and Instructor for the Certified Job Search Strategist training program for career coaches.

Tagged with: ,
2 comments on “Incorporating Keywords In Your Resume
  1. Jeaentte B. says:

    Thank you for the interesting article. I am a professional who was layed-off in 2009 (company closed). Due to the poor economy combined with three jobs in five prior years (volatile pharmaceutical industry), my resume submissions went unanswered. I went back to school in 2009 and received a BS in Business this December (GPA: 4.0!), during which time I did a little recruiting and consulting. I am now enrolled in a masters program at Villanova. Is it OK to put my education at the top of my resume? I know that it’s what new college grads with no experience should do, but I have 15 years of relevant work experience.
    Thanks for your thoughts!
    JVB

  2. Jeanette,

    I recommend including a mention of your recent degree(s) in your executive profile and then list the full educational credential after the experience section. That gives you the ability to highlight both your degree and years of experience in your profile.

    In the experience section, I would include a line or two about the fact that you have been attending college. For example: ABC College and Villanova University – 2009-Present. That way it won’t look like you have been strictly job searching for three years.

    Beverly

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*